The “Reading Room”

toilet2Before you read much further, this particular musing is not for people with delicate sensibilities…

Many of us, at one point or another in our lives, have spent significant time sitting in the “reading room.” So you aren’t confused and we’re all on the same page, I’m speaking of the bathroom and sitting on the “throne” or “pot.”

Have you ever wondered why people sit in there so long? It’s not a particularly pleasant setting… the ambiance isn’t exactly inspiring, the seat isn’t exactly comfortable, and the aroma can’t typically be classified as pleasant. Most of the reading materials I’ve seen aren’t up-to-date and the games that sometimes can be found in the “reading room” aren’t exactly the most state of the art digital games. So the question remains…why is it such a popular place?

I’ve heard it said that it’s the only quiet place in the house. Others have said that it’s just a habit that got started when they were kids and it’s the only way “it” works.  Still others indicate that it’s a solace from the demands of the world… a time that they don’t have to “be” someone or do anything. Moms say that it’s sometimes the only way they can get any alone time….but the kids keep knocking on the door.  So is it really a place of refuge or one of those places that we hope is a place to get away?

But the real question is, how many un-pleasantries and discomforts will we tolerate for a false, temporary sense of peace, rest and solace? I guess we all have limits.

Too often we believe that uncomfortable, smelly, and unpleasant are sometimes better than the alternatives. But… there is only one source of true peace, rest and solace… it’s in Christ.

What are you willing to put up with instead of experiencing true peace?

 

May 2016 Whetstone Newsletter

 

May 2016 FB

Hey!  Welcome to the May 2016 edition of the Whetstone Newsletter!  We’ve got some great articles and resources this month.  But, first some exciting stuff has been going on with the Whetstone.

  • We are on Facebook! Like the Whetstone here.
  • The Whetstone has been transferred from the old website to www.thewhetstone.co update your bookmarks!
  • The Whestone is also on Instagram. Follow us @the.whetstone
  • There is a Whetstone backpacking trip in the works this summer. You’ll be able to backpack for a weekend in the Snowy Range with the Whetstone staff! Stay tuned for more details.

Read

Five Awkward Conversations Every Teen Needs to Have with Their ParentsJaquelle Crowe

“Parents and teenagers, avoid that silence at all costs. Instead, talk. And when the awkward conversations come, embrace them, because they’re far better than the alternative.”

Spiritual and personal growth do not come easily. In fact I would argue that growth in those areas do not come without discomfort. Helping our children grow is not going to be comfortable either. But, the more often we can have these conversations the easier they will become and the better our relationships will be.

Young Men — Is This You?Geoffrey R. Kirkland

“Our culture desperately needs men. Not boys! We have plenty of boys. The church needs men, real men, godly men, holy men, biblical men.”

This is not just for young men, but for all of us who are striving to become the men God created us to be. My favorite in the list? Discipline. I wrote about discipline here a while back.

The Unappreciated Blessing of Busyness David Qaoud

“See, there’s a difference between busy and hurry. Busy is when you have a lot on your plate. Hurry is when you have too much on your plate.”

I like that David separates out busyness and hurry. But, I don’t know if, in our society, they are separate. I think busyness and hurry have become synonymous. David lists out 4 blessings of busyness in his article. 1-Fights temptation 2-Sparks Innovation 3-Increased Self-Awareness 4-Identifies with Jesus. Again however, You’re not too busy anyway.

Listen

Inviting Our Children into the Larger StoryRansomed Heart Podcast

Morgan and Allen share how they are actively fathering their sons in the journey from boyhood to manhood.

“If you want to know how you’re doing as a parent, you can start to seriously consider that question when your kids are about 40.”

If you have a son, this is a must listen podcast on walking with your son into manhood.

What are you doing to walk with your son toward manhood?

Watch

 

This is looking to be a great film with a great message from the guys at Ransomed Heart.  See more about it below below

Do

A Story Worth Living is showing at select theaters nationwide on May 19th. Get your small group, buddies, sons together and checkout this beautiful film. See the trailer in the “Watch” section above.

“Six novice riders—father, sons and friends—take on the Colorado backcountry on BMW F800GS adventure bikes to create a film about life, meaning and the longing to be part of something epic that is written on every human heart.”

 

Stay Sharp,

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What Is This Time For?

Kairos

“There is a time for everything, and a season for every activity under heaven” (Ecclesiastes 3:1)

What is time, anyway? Just some arbitrary numerical assignment based on the rotation of the earth? A way to keep track of when to eat lunch? Or how long ‘till we get to clock out? Modern man has done an impressive job of keeping track of time. According to “timeanddate.com”: Atomic clocks deviate only 1 second in about 20 million years. The international System of Units (SI) defines one second as the time it takes a Cesium-133 atom at the ground state to oscillate exactly 9,192,631,770 times. Wow!!

The clocks in our external brains (cell phones) in turn, receive radio signals that keep them in sync with this ridiculously accurate time. So we know EXACTLY what time it is when we check our phones every three minutes.

And yet we still lose track of time. Hmmm….

The Greeks had two words for time.
“Chronos” is the root for several of our “time and date” words like chronology, chronometer, and chronicles. The time of the clock. In Greek mythology, Chronos was often depicted as an old, wise man with a long beard. Father time. Time as a tool, time to be planned, scheduled, and measured. Quantitative.

But also sometimes portrayed in artwork as a wild eyed ogre of a man eating his own children. Disturbing. Time that nags, accuses, and devours. Time that waits for no man. Frantic, anxious ridden time. The digital atomic clock that keeps track out to the millionth of a second. Time as a slave master.
In summary “Chronos” asks, and sometimes demands:

WHAT TIME IS IT!?!

“Kairos”, on the other hand, is entirely different. Meaning “the right or opportune moment; a period or season, a moment of indeterminate time in which an event of significance happens.” Spontaneous, joyful, invigorating. And at the same time somehow restful. Pure gift. Pure grace. Sabbath. While we can be prepared for it, we can’t create it. We’re just called to recognize it and be willing to respond to the invitation. While time waits for no man, God is the creator of time. He is sovereign. Kairos time is God’s gift that beckons us to trust in His sovereignty. To trust in His provision. To trust in His goodness.

“For we are God’s handiwork, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.” (Ephesians 2:11)

In summary “Kairos” asks, and the Holy Spirit nudges:

What is this time for?

Don’t get me wrong. This side of heaven in this broken world, we need chronos to provide some sense of order. But it should be a tool we use to help order our days and our lives, not a tyrant that orders us around. And as tempting as it may sound, we can’t live in Kairos time 24/7. At least not yet.

So I encourage you to keep watch for those nuggets of Kairos, those grace filled glimpses of heaven that God provides and uses to prepare us for eternity.

Then respond and enjoy God’s goodness and Grace!